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1990s

Demolition Man

The COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic made quite a few people remember the many outbreak films Hollywood has made.  It made me remember “Demolition Man”.

Of course, it wasn’t for the main plot point of the movie – a violent cop and a violent criminal are cryogenically frozen, and are brought back centuries in the future to discover the world is much different.

It’s for the little ways the future changed and why.

The Long Kiss Goodnight

How the hell did this cost $65 million?

That’s almost as much as it cost to make “The Rock” the same year, and that got us Sean Connery, Nicholas Cage and Ed Harris, and it got the studio more than twice that at the box office.

But darn it, I love “The Long Kiss Goodnight”.

Malice

The early 1990s were a good time to do husband and wife thrillers, and “Malice” is just about the best. Coming of his hit play-turned-movie “A Few Good Men”, Aaron Sorkin pens this story of intrigue, after which he veered off into politics with “The American President”, “The West Wing” and “Charlie Wilson’s War.”

Rob Roy

“Braveheart” got the attention but “Rob Roy” deserved more.

I don’t think there is a better swashbuckler with smarter, dry and wittier dialogue than Rob Roy.  Oddly, the best dialogue is with the supporting cast.

Groundhog Day

I love recommending another take to a film that’s about another take, after another and another and another.

“Groundhog Day” just may be the best Bill Murray comedy, and that’s a pretty high standard.  It’s probably in a fourway cluster at the top of my favorites (with “Meatballs”, “Caddyshack and “Scrooged”) but this is his crowning achievement.